A color clients expectations

For most of last year, when travelling and teaching one thing came up over and over gain, and that was managing the clients expectation, it didn’t matter the class or the level it was as if this was the biggest thing in the room. Last year I did write about the consultation you can read that here, but I do think this is something worth touching on so we can split clients into a few different groups, but before we do that, its important that we as an industry stand tall and proud, we are the ones who have the knowledge, been on the courses, up skilling all the time and we shouldn’t be afraid of a colour change or the word NO, if we feel its applicable. read more

four applications of Balayage

Classic Balayage pieces should be very close and soft at the root leading to a thicker highlight at the ends of the hair. Balayage is applied on the surface of the section and not saturated through the section until the very tips, otherwise you would have a streak of colour that isn’t very soft at all. It can also be called a freehand technique because no foil or meche is used to create the highlights, instead we use professional cling film to separate the layers which is much softer. Because it’s handpainted, your colourist can choose the placements to best complement your haircut, skin and features so it looks really natural rather than actually coloured. There’s no stripy look, it emulates what you would get naturally.
Balayage has evolved as people have experimented with it, and it now falls into different categories – creative, classic, micro, Californian, and this allows colourists to work in many different ways which gives them more creativity. New York Lights, the face framing technique is the most important for any age; it’s natural, beautiful and gives an instant lift. 6 pieces can make all the difference, it doesn’t have to be a headful of balayage to make an impact.
Classic Balayage is saturated at the ends and product is loaded in the mid-lengths, feathered up to the root and spread down over the surface of the section for a seamless finish.
Creative Balayage is saturated at the ends and product is loaded in the mid-lengths. The difference here is that whilst we spread the product down to the ends, we only feather slightly for a more subtle finish.
Micro Balayage is achieved by saturating the ends, loading product just above this and feathering up. California is a much heavier incarnation of this application; still very soft at the root but much more coverage. read more

The pro hair difference part 2

The Pro difference part 2
The other  month we where talking numbers, From decline in salon visits and how we under index in every colour except blonde to the shocking amount of women who feel they can get the same colour at home as the salon and those tricky mixers who do colour at home and in the salon .This month i’m going to share some ideas and thoughts on how to get women women back into the salon
Across all colour shades women have told us through a loreal professional survey that they want from colour, the biggest desire is that it looks natural, rich.even,different tones, subtle tones and many others but the stand out was natural read more

The Pro Hair difference part one

I had a great time at Pro hair live Manchester and London talking the business of colour to a really engaged audience over the next 2 articles i’m going into a little more depth for you there is so much information i can’t get it all into one article but if you are hoping to grow your colour business there are some amazing facts and figures, i hope it helps you grow you colour revenue thanks to my friends at Loreal for the stats read more

A look back at balayage and 2015

As I look back over the year it’s scattered with highlights (no pun intended!) It started with a bang with the launch of Jack Howard at Paul Edmonds, and what a brilliant collaboration it’s been. Working alongside such a caring talented man with a brilliant team where everyone has made me feel so welcome has just been fantastic. read more